Bloomington / Normal, IL

Working with the community... for a healthier community.

Alzheimer's Disease

  August 02, 2018
Submitted by Reflections Memory Care
  1. How many Americans over age 65 may have Alzheimer’s disease?
        a.    as many as 5 million
        b.    as many as 50 million
        c.    as many as 100 million
  2. The most well-established risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease is
        a.    increasing age
        b.    depression
        c.    poor diet
  3. Another risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease is
        a.    poor vision
        b.    arthritis
        c.    family history of the disease

  4. What approaches to healthy aging are being studied for
        preventing AD?
        a.    lowering high blood pressure
        b.    being physically active
        c.    eating a healthy diet
        d.    all of the above

  5. It is important to have an early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease
        a.    so that patients and families can plan for the future
        b.    so that the symptoms can be better managed
        c.    so that other diseases can be ruled out
        d.    all of the above

  6. With Alzheimer’s disease, the time from diagnosis to end of life
        a.    can be as little as 3 years
        b.    may be as long as 10 years or more
        c.    both of the above

  7. People with mild Alzheimer’s disease may be helped in day-to-day living by
        a.    a list of daily plans
        b.    notes about simple safety measures
        c.    written directions describing how to use common household items
        d.    all of the above

  8. A person’s genetic makeup can affect the risk of developing
        a.    early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.
        b.    late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.
        c.    both early- and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.
Answers:
  1.  A is the correct answer. Estimates vary, but experts suggest that as many as 5 million people in the United States may have Alzheimer’s disease. Most of them are age 65 or older, but those with a rare, inherited form may be in their 30s, 40s, and 50s.

  2. A is the correct answer. Increasing age is the most important known risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. The disease usually begins after 65, and the risk goes up with age.

  3. C is the correct answer. Family history is another risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists have found genetic links to both early-onset and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Over recent years, more than a dozen gene variants have been linked to late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of the disease. Researchers have also identified genes involved in the rare, early-onset form of Alzheimer’s. Discovery of genes—both that confer risk and offer protection—may help researchers to more effectively test possible treatments and prevention strategies in people who are at risk of developing Alzheimer’s—ideally, before symptoms appear.

  4. D is the correct answer. Some observational studies have linked controlling blood pressure, being physically active, and eating a healthy diet with a reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, there are no lifestyle treatments, drugs, or pills that have been shown to prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

  5. D is the correct answer. Although there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, early diagnosis makes it possible to consider treatment options and make legal and financial arrangements while the person with Alzheimer’s can still take part in making decisions. Early treatment may help the person function independently for longer. Also, doctors may find other possible causes of the person’s symptoms, such as thyroid problems, drug reactions, depression, brain tumors, or blood-vessel disease in the brain. Some of these other conditions can be treated successfully.

  6. C is the correct answer. With Alzheimer’s disease, the time from diagnosis to end of life varies. It can be as little as 3 years if the person is over 80 years old when diagnosed, or as long as 10 years or more if the person is younger.

  7. D is the correct answer. Memory aids may help some people with mild Alzheimer’s disease with day-to-day living. A big calendar, a list of daily plans, notes about simple safety measures, and written directions describing how to use common household items can be useful.

  8. C is the correct answer. A person’s genetic make-up can affect the risk of developing both early- and late-onset forms of Alzheimer’s disease. Early-onset Alzheimer’s, a rare form of the disease affecting 5 percent or fewer of people with Alzheimer’s, can be directly inherited. One gene—apoE4—may increase a person’s risk of having the common, late-onset form of the disease, which occurs after age 65.
Reflections Memory Care and The Villas of Holly Brook — Pekin are located at 2720 S.14th Street in Pekin. Call for more information or to inquire about a personal tour at 309-201-3763, or visit www.villasofhollybrook.com to view the community online.

Source: www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/winter15/articles/winter15pg12.html. Back to Top

August 02, 2018

 

Copyright © Agility Inc. 2018